Phonetic notation
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How we present pronunciation in this course


Pronunciation symbols
For this course we have developed an oversimplified, yet effective way to show Swedish pronunciation. Here is an overview of the phonetic symbols we use and the sound each one represents.
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[ ŋ ] is the ng sound in English sing ett finger fiŋ-er a finger
[ ɕ ] is the frontal sh sound as in English sheep. It is usually spelled tj or k (the "soft k sound"). en kyss ɕys a kiss
[ ʂ ] is a slighly darker sh sound as in show. It is usually spelled rs in Swedish. (It's okay if you don't hear any difference between this sound and the "soft k" yet.) en person pe-ʂo:n a person
[ ɧ ] is the famous Swedish sj sound. This sound doesn't exist in English. It is similar to the j in the Spanish Juan. It can be spelled in various ways in Swedish, including sj, sk (the "soft sk sound"), and skj en skärm ɧerm a screen
[ ʈ ] is a retroflex t. It's a combination r and t sound, similar the normal t, but the tongue is curled so the tip is touching just behind the palate. There is no exact English equivalent. It is usually spelled rt in Swedish. en sport spåʈ a sport
[ ɖ ] is a retroflex d. It's a combination r and d sound, similar the normal d, but the tongue is curled so the tip is touching just behind the palate. There is no exact English equivalent. It is usually spelled rd in Swedish. ett bord bo:ɖ a table
[ ɳ ] is a retroflex n. It's a combination r and n sound, similar the normal n, but the tongue is curled so the tip is touching just behind the palate. There is no exact English equivalent. It is usually spelled rn in Swedish. ett barn ba:ɳ a child
[ ɭ ] is a retroflex l. It's a combination r and l sound, similar the normal l, but the tongue is curled so the tip is touching just behind the palate. There is no exact English equivalent. It is usually spelled rl in Swedish. Karl ka:ɭ Carl
[ ː ] the colon indicates a long vowel sound. ett krig kri:g a war

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